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there for the president, things we haven't thought of, foreign policy crises yet to come and an economy that has been sluggish. a couple of things to realize. first of all the economy has not been in that great a shape and the president was reelected nonetheless. while eventually i think voters might get fed up with his economic stewardship, they might not. secondly whether the president wants to hold up shiny objects for the press, we know the debt ceiling fight will come to a head. we know it will be a major clash. the president wants to maintain upper hand here. not so much what you or i might think is really going on. it is what voters think is going on. how they see things. he wants to maintain his image at a reasonable, rational guy versus a, band of republicans he wants to faint as extreme, out of touch and unreasonable. jon: weill look for him to, at that conversation at this news conference. david drucker. >> that's correct. that's what it is all birks we'll have to leave it there. thanks, david. >> anytime. heather: as we wait for the news conference scheduled to take place just about 11:30
the private and the public economy, balance between the cost and hoped for advantages, balance between the clearly necessary and the comfortably desireable, balance between our essential requirements as a nation and the duties imposed by the nation upon the individual, balance between actions of the moment and the national welfare of the future. good judgment seeks balance in progress, lack of it eventually finds imbalance and frustration. >> words of president eisenhower 52 years ago. are those words relevant today as he talked about what government can and cannot do in solving problems. that speech is still available online. and pointing out those remarks giving the country a dire warning about what he described as a threat to democratic government. he also used the phrase military industrial complex. since then that has become a rallying cry of opponents for expansion. in an effort to control the expansion of the military industrial complex the president sought to cut the pentagon's budget. he wanted a budget he said the country could afford. share your thoughts about the role you t
of whether where it is was. i like the deutsch call. unless we have a lot of trouble with our economy here, judge, which i don't think we're going to have, i think this continues to work and works back into the mid-40s by the end of this quarter. >> talk to me, weiss, about some airlines. they have been doing incredibly well. lately here is ual and lcc. >> they were early in upgrading the airlines and the airlines used to be like drinking beer. you rented it. you didn't own it. now you've got the airline business changed completely. so the fundamentals are very good. not as competitive as they used to be. they know how to allocate their capital. the merger between u.s. air and american is in the stocks. that will make it even better. i disagree. i think you hold them and buy on dips. >> let's go to jackie deangeles. jackie? >> that's right, scott. platinum is selling above gold for the first time in ten months. what is the best bet for 2013? rachel is at the cme in chicago and anthony in new york. is gold just moving up today on platinum's move? >> definitely gold is moving up on platinum.
are and as much as we can tell about the economy and financial sector, we will be obsessed with jamie dimon, if he didn't get as much of a bonus as normal because his pristine reputation because of the wale slipping -- thing we can find as members of the media. >> $6 million trade on a balance sheet of -- >> i don't know how much they made in spite of that. a lot. >>> speaking of the bank, another -- >> look who's here! >> and dressed normally, too. >> can we get the man a chair? he can't sit -- ♪ >> we thought you were trying on different zweaters. on a day like this, what is the right look for a young, happening, dashing -- >> what -- what -- >> you have time. don't do this to viewers. it's not that important. did you not get make-up? >> no. he didn't. >> look at -- this is natural beauty. >> you didn't shave -- you really think you need to be here that much that you can't get make-up? >> absolutely. >> taking one for the team. >> all right. >> speaking of this -- stay on us, please. morgan stanley will take -- you can get powder or something if you want. just headlines -- >> the women didn't
? it's hard enough getting jobs right now in this economy. veterans' unemployment is a little bit higher than the national rate. then you have people who are dealing with some type of wound as they try to get back into the workforce. do we have to curry the jobs towards their skills? >> no, i don't think so. i think these disabled veterans bring lots of skills and leadership skills as well as the breadth and depth of experience they had in the services back to local communities. what has occurred is the u.s. army in 2007 asked the national organization on disabilities to help develop a solution to this problem, and they created three locations in north carolina, texas and colorado to work very closely with these stabled veterans. it was one on one with other veterans working with veterans, primarily disabled with disabled, very career-intensive veterans centric and focused on transitioning them back into civil society. the success rate has been over 70% of those veterans after 18 months have a job or they're in some sort of educational environment to include vocational training. i
this era of underemployment and structural issues in the economy. >> you think the ipad is the most important new development since the i.b.m. p.c.? >> i do. >> rose: because? >> because it -- i'll start with if you look at the time of day the most common time of day for people to use their ipad is between 6:00 p.m. and when they go to sleep. when what is that known in your line of work? that's known as prime time. and it turns out the ipad isn't the second screen when people are watching t.v. for people over the age of 40, when they're in bed watching t.v. with their ipad, the ipad's actually the thing they're paying attention to and the t.v. is the background noise, if something happens they look up and look at it. why is that important? first of all could you have imagine five years ago that there would be a product that would go from zero to 50 million yunz overnight and the single most common thing to do would be to read in the bed at night? a technology product? that was to me unimaginable five years ago. so i look at this and i wonder what is there anything it cannot do that'
for not crashing the american economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the united states of america is not a bargaining chip. >> as you would expect, republicans quick to respond. senate minority leader mitch mcconnell said in part the president and his allies need to get serious about spending, and the debt-limit debate is the perfect time for it. republican congresswoman marsha blackburn of tennessee took it a step further, suggesting her party was ready for a government shutdown. >> we're going to look at all of these options. you know, there is the option of government shutdown. there is an option of raising the debt ceiling in short-term increments. >> would you be willing, if you don't get the kind of cuts that you think are necessary, would you be willing to go into default or to shut down the government? >> i think that there is a way to avoid default if it requires shutting down certain portions of the government, let's look at that. >> according to a recent gallup poll, there are growing concerns about washington's
year and the fourth year. >> harder when he's a candidate to an achieve. the economy, they said if they passed the massive unemployment, it'd keep under 8%, it was spiked up to 10% and down to 7.8 and they say it's a fail. and killed osama bin laden, and passed health care, what kind of program we'll be we're only getting it now, it passed two years ago. >> alisyn: and iraq, promised to end iraq and making steps towards that as well. >> iraq and afghanistan. >> although unemployment continues to be a problem. i read this morning one more person unemployed, manti te'o's imagery girlfriend has lost her job. >> her imagery job. >> she didn't show up. >> we found out she was alive before she didn't exist. >> and people in kentucky picked up a phone and senator mitch mcconnell was calling them on the television and recorded a message sent out to about 250,000 people who live in kentucky. and who own guns who are hunters and he personally pledged as the minority leader in the u.s. senate, he will not allow the president's gun control measures to go through. and here is a little bit of
industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>steve: welcome back. the welfare state is growing and sadly on so many levels no sign of it slowing down. >>gretchen: that according to a new chart released by republicans on two senate budget committees. according to dana colmes, federal welfare spending expected to skyrocket 80 % over the next decade. stew varney is here. how did he come up with that calculation? >> that is government numbers used by republican members of the senate budget committee. it represents a whole new america. in fact, it represents a total reversal from the days of welfare reform in the mid-1990's. welfare has made an enormous come-back. there are no plans to rein it in. it is going to go up by $11 trillion. spending on welfare up $11 trillion
the economy of louisiana expand, and basically progress. >> he's saying if you make louisiana a great place to come, companies will come. >> yes. >> peter: and people will have work? >> yes. >> peter: but the trade-off is, higher sales tax. so the question today is, that a regresssive tax? >> yes. >> peter: as you economists say? >> yes. >> peter: what does that mean? >> everybody pays it. no relation to how much you earn. it's how much you spend. you pay tax according to what you spend. a sales tax, it tax consumption. so in that sense, yes. it is regresssive. but on the other hand, if the absence of income taxes creates a growing economy, everybody wins from that. >> peter: some states don't have income tax. >> there are seven. i'll read them, alaska, florida, nevada, south dakota, texas, washington, and wyoming. on the map. these states have no income taxes at the state level. louisiana wants to become the eighth state and north carolina, may become the ninth state. even oklahoma, they, too, are considering getting rid of personal income taxes at the state level. >> peter: these are in s
, it's critically important and timely. >> the greatest challenge the american economy has is the american congress. >> you know, it is. it really is, if you look at what's happening out there. and i've been saying this. and you guys have been saying it, too. because you go out and you talk to americans and they're discouraged by what's going on. and you say, wait a second. guys, we're in a century right now with the most technologically advanced country with the greatest universities, the greatest schools, we're going to win. >> that's right. >> even the chinese say america has eight out of the top ten universities on the planet. as you said, we've got energy. and you know this better than anybody else. there have been surveys. you ask chinese students what their biggest complaint about their education is, and they go, that our teachers don't teach us how to think like americans. >> that's right. >> they're crazy, those americans, and we want to have some of that. and you talk about -- you talk about this energy revolution, and americans need to hear this. >> it's right th
is fantastic on its face. a boss pays people to lose weight. >> if you can't get a raise in a tough economy, maybe your boss will pay you to lose weight. this company offers programs where the incentive to lower body mass index or cholesterol numbers is cash. more employers are looking for programs that will get workers fit. it is the result, of course, and you can probably imagine, of the rising health care costs associated with insurance and reduced productivity, workers dealing with obesity and other chronic health issues reportedly cost more than $153 billion a year in lost productivity because they are absent from work. >>steve: one of the great things is if you're in shape studies have shown you actually do more, a better job at work. >> and you're going to ward off the flu probably easier too. >>gretchen: cheaper health care costs for employers. >> always worry about their bottom line. >>brian: talk about pom granite juice. >> the f.e.c. released a final constituted by did pom juice. a judge ruled it used deceptive advertising in that it can treat or prevent heart disease, prostate c
in washington. for washington, this is a great injection into the economy. host: this is from one of our viewers -- guest: thought the inauguration funding has not changed very much. the best comparison for this year is 2005, the george w. bush second inauguration, $45 million was raised for his committee. security costs there were comparable. there rose fivefold after 9/11. by 2005 they were in the $100 million range. this inauguration, despite hardships, the numbers are staying fairly concept -- fairly constant. host: our first president was sworn in on april 30 in new york city. it has moved back and forth from the east front to other locations on capitol hill. from harry truman through jimmy carter, it was always on the east front of the capital. moved by the congressional committee to the west front in 1985, which is where it remains today. kansas, independent line, good morning. caller: i think it is amazing that we all want to complain about every penny that is spent in washington, d.c., because of the inauguration. this is something special that happens every four years. surely, surely,
. and then the president says he's not negotiating on the debt ceiling. what does that mean for our economy? senator rob portman says he's got an idea and alternative. that senator up next. here he comes. >>gretchen: welcome back. how big of a threat is our national debt? one theme from the hbo film "too big to fail" spells out the risks pretty clearly. watch it. >> the threats from russia, they suggest we coordinate and without warning dump hundreds of billions of if fannie's and freddie's bonds on to the market. the amount of debt your country carries is a terrible vulnerability. >>gretchen: a terrible vulnerability. senator rob portman couldn't agree more. he's a member of the senate finance committee and former budget director for george w. bush. good morning to you, senator. when we hear this vulnerability, you agree with that; right? >> absolutely. the president yesterday said we need to raise the debt limit because we have to pay our bills. we're at historic levels, $130,000 per family right now, over $16.5 trillion. yes, we need to raise the debt limit at some point but we have to do it in the c
economy. home builder confidence holding steady at a seven-year high. taking a live look at the big board. the dow is down 26. the nasdaq up 7. s&p is flat. >>> a chinese factory will start making one model of jeep. chrysler isn't saying which model it will be. but the vehicles made in china will be sold in that country. chrysler sold 50,000 suvs in champion last year. the jeeps will be made by a company that's already building fiats in china and fiat owns chrysler. >>> let's brick up up to date on some of the other top stories we're following for you. we're minutes away from hearing president obama's plan to reduce gun violence. the president will tell us what he wants from congress as ally el -- as well as the executive actions he's prepared to take on his own. the president is tu to speak at 8:55. ktvu will bring it to you live. we'll stream it live at >>> well, the mayor of london says it's too early to know the exact cause of today's deadly helicopter crash right in the heart of london during rush hour. the helicopter hit a crane on top of a tower. the pilot of the helicopt
of the created conglomeration of the economy looks like for those and students here at the school of public health taught me about these opportunities to quantify attitudes towards conflict and aggression and we were able to show with a fall of 28 days surveys before and after the intervention that there was a short term improvement in those attitudes and that is in my talking and academic arena prevention outreach added to the conflict and aggression, 98 kids cross 13 months and then i was invited to go to new york. mayor bloomberg isn't here but mtv executives invited me to a video that had an antiviolence fema and i said that interests me let me see that. well, this was about eight years ago. my 15 year old was then 7-years-old but i didn't know much about 50-cent, the rapper that had this ongoing dual with jarule come and 50 have more credibility why? i told the story 150 times and shot nine times he has more credibility. but does that say about our culture of violence? taking credit by the way being shot nine times. [applause] the video that i salles enrage me to it was the same cultur
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)